February 20, 2020

Are Home Workouts Effective?

Show Notes

On this episode, Chuck Gaidica is joined by Dan Muncey, onsite well-being coordinator at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. Together, they discuss how to get the most out of your home workouts. From the treadmill to weight training and yoga, you can produce lasting results.

“I think people get caught in ‘I have to go to the gym to work out’ because it’s something that gets them out of the house. Maybe [it] breaks their normal routine? But you can break your normal routine by just scheduling that home workout… Not only is it going to be more convenient, it’s going to be time saving.” – Dan Muncey

In this episode of A Healthier Michigan Podcast, we explore:

  • The importance of regular exercise
  • The impact on heart health and seasonal affective disorder (SAD)
  • Anaerobic versus aerobic exercises
  • Bodyweight exercises you can do at home
  • High-intensity interval training (HIIT)
  • Scheduling workouts and being consistent
  • Finding the right exercise app or program

 

Transcript

Chuck Gaidica:
This is A Healthier Michigan Podcast Episode 48. Coming up we discuss how effective are home workouts.

Chuck Gaidica:
Welcome to A Healthier Michigan Podcast. This is a podcast dedicated to getting you in and around ideas in how you can improve your health, your well-being, through small healthy habits that we can all start implementing right now. I’m your host Chuck Gaidica. Every other week we’re going to sit down with a certified health expert from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and dive into topics covering nutrition, fitness, and a lot more.

Chuck Gaidica:
And in this episode we are discussing home workouts. Can they be just as effective as going to a gym? With me is onsite well-being coordinator for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Dan Muncey. Good to see you again.

Dan Muncey:
Chuck, always a pleasure.

Chuck Gaidica:
Thank you. You’ve got so much stuff. You’re always out there working out, riding your bike, hanging out with family. You’ve got a lot of experience working in the health industry and being a well-being coordinator for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan puts you out amongst a lot of people. So I’m sure you get inputs all the time about what’s the best workout, where should I go? Should I get the cheapy membership and then there’s the one you sign up and you thought you could get out of it in a year and you can’t.

Chuck Gaidica:
But the whole point of this podcast is to say have you ever met somebody in the military? I mean, have you ever seen guys and women who are doing pushups, and pull ups, and jumping Jacks, and I don’t see them using a lot of weights, and I look at that and I think what am I missing? Why don’t I just do stuff at home that doesn’t require a bunch of money?

Dan Muncey:
I agree, Chuck. I think that’s the biggest thing when you’re talking about benefits of a home workout is you’re looking at body weight exercises. You look at the military they’re doing jumping Jacks, pushups, they’re running miles.

Chuck Gaidica:
Right.

Dan Muncey:
And the thing is it’s convenient. It’s something you always have access to. I think people get caught in I have to go to the gym to workout because it’s something that gets them out of the house, maybe breaks their normal routine, but you can break your normal routine by just scheduling that home workout, and not only is it going to be more convenient it’s going to be time saving.

Dan Muncey:
You’re not actually going to the gym. We like to talk about you only have so many hours in a day. You can’t get more time. As much as you want to try it you can’t have more than 24 hours in a day, and if you know that, and you think to yourself, wow, I can save a half hour going to and from the gym that’s an hour back into my day, that could be an hour workout, and all of a sudden that hour workout you were doing is now obligated to now it’s something else.

Dan Muncey:
You can actually spend that time with your family, spend that time catching up on sleep, spend that time prepping your meals for the week. I always like to talk about heart health when we bring up exercise. Still heart health is the number one killer in America. One in four individuals face heart disease of some kind in their lifetime and with that it’s good to know that regular exercise that you’re doing in your leisure is associated with positive health outcomes.

Dan Muncey:
I was looking through the American Heart Association, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the American College of Medicine, all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for prevention and for complimentary treatment of several diseases, and I think that’s amazing, right? This great resource you have access to that you can do in the safety and comfort of your own home.

Chuck Gaidica:
So let’s unpack that a minute because we’ve had another podcast, this idea, and I think with you too we’ve talked about anaerobic and aerobic exercise, right? More cardio versus weightlifting. From your perspective is it just a balance? Is it just common sense that we really should be doing both to the extent that neither one of those is stressing up out?

Dan Muncey:
Yeah, and I think whatever works for you I think is always the best way to start. I think you want to get a good healthy routine. If you like to lift weight, life weights. Get a routine. You’re doing it two days a week, three days a week. You like to run, you’re running three days a week, five days a week, but at some point you have to ask yourself could I be more balanced with my workouts? Could I have better input in my own physical well-being?

Dan Muncey:
And being more balanced, if you’re lifting weights, you’re strengthening your muscles, you’re working on your cardio, maybe you’re getting better endurance, and you’re being more well balanced and you’re not going to have injury as likely.

Chuck Gaidica:
So the idea of being at home, and I know you were talking about saving time, because let’s face it a lot of people are getting used to telecommuting, right? You’re saving that amount of time of not getting in the car and driving, but while at the club I may have people coming up to me to say hi. At home, if you’re a young family, you’ve got kids at home. I lay down on the floor just to lay down and take a couple 20s and do some flys and my dogs are coming. They want to kiss me on the face. It’s like, oh my gosh, I just want to workout, can I just have a minute?

Dan Muncey:
So it is kind of a double edged sword to do it at home too sometimes. I agree. I think that there’s privacy working out at home. I think that’s something we can all value that we don’t have to feel like others are judging us.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah.

Dan Muncey:
But you have to worry about distractions and I think that’s something whether you’re at the gym, or you’re at your home, you have to plan for it, you know?

Chuck Gaidica:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Dan Muncey:
And if you know your kids are going to get home at a certain time maybe you should workout before they get home. If you know that your kids are bothering you maybe you have to workout after they go to bed at night. I mean, those are just simple changes to your workout routine, or you’re getting up early in the morning, maybe at 6:00 AM to do a podcast. You never know, Chuck. The nice thing is that on top of it helping you with your privacy, keeping you away from distractions, it’s going to be good for your mental health.

Dan Muncey:
I wanted to strive that. I was trying to figure a way to weave that in today because The Mayo Clinic talks about how exercise is going to pump up your endorphins. Physical activity helps bump up the production of those brain’s feel good endorphins, those neurotransmitters called endorphins, and if you’ve been a regular listener to The Healthier Michigan Podcast we talk about that all the time. It’s a great benefit for your body.

Dan Muncey:
And then, if you have worked out, or you’re thinking about it, working out’s almost a form of meditation because when you’re working out you’re thinking about the next physical movement. Your brain isn’t clouded with all the other things that are going on in your life. And then, when we’re talking about the endorphins, we’re talking about this meditative state, you have to remember that it’s going to improve your mood and through that it’s going to improve your self confidence.

Dan Muncey:
And so, there’s a lot of great research around it. It’s going to help you relax. And if you’re working out regularly it’s going to improve your sleep habits. And I don’t know about you Chuck but I always feel better the next day if I’ve had a good night’s rest.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. And you know this idea of heart health we’ve learned through this podcast, and other places, heart health equal sign brain health, and not you’re saying equal sign mental health, because let’s face it if you’re in Michigan catching this podcast right now in February we’ve kind of gone into the cloudy season. It kind of starts in November and sadly in Michigan sometimes we don’t feel like we get out of it. And I think working out it’s not so much a runner’s high kind of thing but it does give you that mental health day where you’re able to sort of see the blue sky.

Chuck Gaidica:
And maybe it has a little bit to do with the fact that you’re seeing progress in your own body shape.

Dan Muncey:
And I love that you brought that up because it’s that seasonal affective disorder that we’re worrying about right now because we’re getting less sun.

Chuck Gaidica:
That’s real for some.

Dan Muncey:
Absolutely, and there’s mild depression associated with that, and you know what the best combative of mild depression is? Physical activity.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. So before we move on I want to talk about this because … Let’s talk really straight about the idea. Here we are, we’re in Michigan. Sometimes the snow is flying sideways. Getting out and just going for the walk around the block is tough but if you really concentrate on all the ways you can achieve cardio even if as crazy as it sounds, you’re maybe not a mall walker, but you’re doing it in your house, you’re using your stairs, you can get workouts that way too.

Dan Muncey:
I always like to talk about it’s what works best for you and I think that there’s always going to be that number one best way to exercise. And we’re talking about the types of exercise, we’re talking about the simplicity of working out at home, and with that there’s different types of workouts whether … We talked about it in the beginning, body weight training. We talked about this. I always talk about high intensity interval training because it’s my favorite, but then you’re looking at yoga, Pilates, walking.

Dan Muncey:
I mean, there’s simple things you can do everyday and that’s just physical activity. We go back to the American Heart Association. They’re talking about minutes worked out not what you’re doing to exercise, so find out what works best for you. Don’t be afraid to try new things.

Chuck Gaidica:
So can we touch on each one of those just a minute? It seems obvious but let’s not make any assumptions, body weight exercises. Literally, I’m going to drop and do 40 pushups, right? And I’m using my own body weight. What other ways do you see that are the most impactful ways we can apply body weight exercises if we’re just starting out?

Dan Muncey:
I think the nice thing about body weight exercises is there’s a modification for every one of them. If you can’t do a squat there’s a modification for it. If you can’t do a pushup there’s a modification for it. And the nice thing about that is it’s going to give you an opportunity to succeed. As a former personal trainer you always want to make sure your clients are set up for success, and you want to set yourself up. Don’t tell yourself I’m going to do 40 pushups if I can’t do five.

Dan Muncey:
Figure out what the modification is. Maybe you’re doing this pushup plank where you’re going from a high plank to a low plank to help build your chest strength, your tricep muscles, and next thing you know after a few months, maybe a year, it’s a timeline. You have to continue to work towards that end goal. So body weight exercises are something that I always like to talk about because it’s something you can do.

Dan Muncey:
And with that then you start building in this circuit training. Maybe you’re doing 30 seconds of pushups, 30 second break, 30 seconds of squats, 30 seconds break. And you’re doing this upper body, lower body. You’re maybe doing more reps, less reps. You can always build it and play around with it but don’t be afraid to explore what opportunities are out there. The worldwide web is a great place to look for information. There’s YouTube. There’s all these great sources.

Dan Muncey:
But I always like to talk about when you’re finding these new exercises you like you want to be set up for success. I mentioned it before. We talked about removing obstacles that when you’re committed to it if you have a schedule, put it on your schedule, find out what time you’re maybe going to be less distracted whether that means you’re doing it in the morning or at night.

Dan Muncey:
You have to figure out what works best for you to kind of remove those.

Chuck Gaidica:
You’ve talked about this before but I read an article and I reread it every once in a while just to see what it’s talking about, and it’s really fascinating. The premise of the article is that we can learn just about anything and see results in 30 days. I mean, if you’ve never played the violin it may not sound great but in about 30 days you can start to get the hang of just about anything.

Chuck Gaidica:
And I think with exercise what’s so cool about this is if I can only do two or five pushups after about 30 days it’s an image builder, it’s a confidence builder, that I did get to 40, you know?

Dan Muncey:
And I love that because that’s like yoga. That’s any practice like that. You want to fail. You want to figure out what you’re not good at and you can actually work on it then. But if you don’t even try then you don’t even know what your opportunities are. And if you’ve been at yoga I’m sure you’ve really worked. And I’ve fallen on my face before trying to do a pose. I mean, it is what it is. You’re there. You’re putting effort in. And the nice thing is you always feel good after a good workout.

Chuck Gaidica:
All right, so let’s talk about HIIT. Is it H-I-I-T? Is that what it is?

Dan Muncey:
Yes. It’s high intensity interval training. And so, I touched on it briefly of saying you’re doing 30 seconds of work, 30 seconds of rest, and there’s many different work to rest ratios but the idea is that you’re having a high intensity workout for a duration of a period followed by a duration of rest. And so, it’s nice because if you have like a treadmill or a bike at home what an easy way to do a HIIT workout.

Dan Muncey:
You could have a sprint on your bike for 30 seconds and then 30 seconds of rest. And you’re going to get more benefits. The research shows that there’s going to be more benefits associated with a HIIT workout than there would be for long duration steady state cardio. And there’s nothing wrong with that though, and I don’t like comparing physical activity like that because what we’re talking about today is working out at home and it’s simplicity, and it’s convenient, and the idea is you’re just punching the clock.

Dan Muncey:
You’re working out. You’re building on that heart rate. And that’s what’s going to good for your overall well-being.

Chuck Gaidica:
But if you’re somebody like me who can tend to get a little bored if you’re doing the same thing you can also combine a couple of these ideas, right? Like you could ride the bike for 30 seconds on a sprint, get off the bike, and rest, and then do your weights. So you can kind of combine circuit training with HIIT.

Dan Muncey:
Yes. And I think the nice thing beyond just what these ideas of workouts are going to be, what they’re going to bring you whether it’s changing it up, building a routine, being able to break your routine, bring in different exercises that maybe you wanted to try, keeping things creative and fun. My dad used to go to the gym every morning at 5:00 AM. He did the same thing every year but that was his routine, that’s what he liked to do. And whether that’s your routine and that’s what you like to do, or you’re willing to branch out and do new things, you want to be successful, and I think Chuck you’re trying to bring in that idea of success through changing it up but what you’re talking about too is being consistent.

Chuck Gaidica:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Dan Muncey:
And I like this idea of that if you’re being consistent you’re showing up every week, you’re trying new things, you’re going to yoga, you’re doing Pilates, you’re doing this in the comfort of your own home, and then through that you’re going to have a routine and you’re going to have accountability because you’ve scheduled it. And then, you’re able to set goals. Where do I want to be a year from now? Where do I want to be a month from now?

Dan Muncey:
And I love that you just said it’s 30 days, it’s three weeks, it’s what are you going to do to build a healthy habit.

Chuck Gaidica:
Little baby goals, right?

Dan Muncey:
Yes.

Chuck Gaidica:
We don’t have to take an entire year and scan out and think this is all going to happen in 30 days either. It’s okay. I do want to ask you this because you’re the perfect guy to ask. You mentioned your dad doing the same routine every day. Is it true or false that your body will adapt so that you really do need to change it up to trick your muscles, or is consistency okay? Your dad seems to have found his zone and he was okay, and that’s great for him.

Dan Muncey:
Yeah, there absolutely is more physical benefits of changing the routine.

Chuck Gaidica:
There is? Okay.

Dan Muncey:
They talk about muscle confusion. But again, when they bring up a lot of that we’re talking about long term implications of strength gain, long term implications of having a faster pace, and for the average person it’s okay to find that routine, be doing the same thing over and over again whether that’s riding the bike, going for a walk, but the idea of changing your workouts is that it’s going to decrease your likelihood for certain types of injury because if you’re doing one type of workout you’re probably just focusing on certain muscle groups, and those other muscle groups are getting weaker.

Dan Muncey:
The supporting muscle groups aren’t able to support the strength and stability like you would if you had a varied routine.

Chuck Gaidica:
So you’ve mentioned Pilates a couple of times. I’ve only walked past a room with vinyl letters on a door and I look and I see the rack and it looks like something out of a scary movie. What is Pilates? What does it do for us?

Dan Muncey:
It’s great mobility. And I think yoga falls right in that. When you’re doing just these steady state balance holds, when you’re working with your own body weight, you’re able to work in the comfort of not pushing yourself beyond your own body’s physical limitations and that’s something when you start bringing in weights into the equation it’s easy to load up that squat rack with too much weight, and then when you get underneath it you can get seriously hurt.

Dan Muncey:
Pilates, yoga, walking, these are very low impact safe exercises. And yeah, like you said, it might be kind of intimidating the first time you walk be a yoga studio and you see people in an inverted pose but that could’ve maybe took years of practice to get there. Same thing at a Pilates station. You might have somebody you see with their head bent over their head. That didn’t happen in one day. And so, I think that’s the nice thing of being able to know your limits but then know that doing exercises like yoga, Pilates, walking, are very safe and you’re going to have positive outcomes.

Chuck Gaidica:
But is Pilates a machine with weights that are assisting me with these moves? Is that what it is?

Dan Muncey:
Yeah. And so, with that we’re talking about how this exercise can maybe elongate our muscles, work on our mobility-

Chuck Gaidica:
I see.

Dan Muncey:
-And then, ultimately have this idea of increasing our overall strength.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah, all right, so you’ve seen benefits there. If you’re removing obstacles to make sure that you’re getting a workout that can also include maybe even scheduling it, right? I mean, you make appointments for everything else. Pick up the kids, go to the doctor, get to the dentist, go shopping. Why not put it down on your phone?

Dan Muncey:
You’ve heard me talk about it last time we were talking about mobile apps and talking about scheduling these workouts and I say the same thing. You’re setting yourself up for success because that schedule is your accountability. If you’ve got a nine to five job that’s on your schedule. I guarantee you’re going to that nine to five job otherwise you’ll probably have some issues.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. You’ve got more time to workout at home.

Dan Muncey:
That’s for sure. And now, you’re thinking about that. If you’re scheduling that workout and you’re consistent with it, you’re building it into your day, you’re finding success. And I really hope that people when we get to the end and we talk about takeaways today it’s just working out has so many positive influences on your overall health. I don’t want to jump ahead but it’s such a great feeling to exercise. Getting those endorphins, you feel relieved, you’re sleeping better. It just builds on itself. So finding that time and that structure to have that accountability, being consistent, having a routine is going to help you progress where you want to get to your goals.

Chuck Gaidica:
So we’ve talked about this idea, you just mentioned it, being consistent. Accountability is a word that we use a lot in varied walks of life but it can be anything from having an app on your phone to being accountable to yourself, to being accountable to your spouse. I mean, there’s a lot of ways that this idea that you’re going to start to work out at home can influence not only you but you can be accountable through even adult peer pressure. As a couple, or whatever, you can start to work out, even as a family.

Dan Muncey:
Yeah. And I love the idea of accountability because we all are going to have those days where maybe we don’t want to workout, we didn’t sleep right, but you know there’s this level of someone whether it’s yourself, a friend, a family member, my buddy Zach. We get up and we hike every Saturday almost, and we used to workout at the gym. We had time for it. And now, our lives got busy. He’s got a family. I have other commitments. And now, all of a sudden you’re sitting there saying when are we going to spend time together and we go for a hike on a Saturday. We wrote that into our schedule.

Dan Muncey:
We have it so that he has his family calendar, I have mine, and it’s so great to see that when I’m looking at that calendar and being like, wow, I get to look forward to that this weekend. We built that in. It took tradition, consistency, and we’ve built from it. Now is like perfect time for us. We love hitting the trails more so now than even because there’s less people out there, there’s less distractions, and for us it’s just great to just catch up and have that comradery.

Chuck Gaidica:
But you’ve got to be careful and I guess this is one of those things, we just saw it over the holidays with Peloton, right? They put out this spot. Anything could be looked at as body shaming nowadays.

Dan Muncey:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Chuck Gaidica:
It seems like, right? You can interpret all kinds of things any which way. Accountability, if you’re going to do this with your partner even if it’s just a friend from a distance if you’re really good buds then I think you just say “Hey, if you want to go for hike it’s okay.” But when you say to your wife as the Peloton commercial “Honey, look I got you a bike” and immediately social blows up like, oh my gosh, is this husband just thinking his wife needs to lose weight, or what’s it about.

Chuck Gaidica:
Accountability, let’s deal with that for a minute. How do you navigate that space so you’re being accountable or asking somebody else to be accountable without imposing your own views about “Well, that’s too many cookies there honey.” What do you think?

Dan Muncey:
Chuck, you bring up a great point because you have to talk about those things. You can’t impose your will on someone else and you shouldn’t let someone else impose their will on you. You should do what’s best for you. And obviously, Zach and me have years of building a great friendship, and the one thing that we’ve been consistent with when we talk about home workouts is we’ll just check-in every day. What did you do today? I went for a walk. I swung my kettle bells.

Chuck Gaidica:
No kidding. That’s a pretty intense connection though.

Dan Muncey:
But we built that relationship, right?

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah.

Dan Muncey:
We talked about what our goals are and that’s where we maybe go onto a four week workout plan, and we know that we’re working out every other day, and it’s just that awesome accountability where I know that Zack worked out today, and maybe I couldn’t workout because I had to get up early for things, but I know in the back of my mind I’m like Zach checked in today. I need to check-in today.

Chuck Gaidica:
What if you don’t check in? Is it okay for Zach to call you a slacker? I mean, your relationship is strong enough where you go, “Hey, what’s going on?.”

Dan Muncey:
And again, I think that’s what we’ve built. We’ve built a relationship where we like that sarcasm, that hard time, because it’s got us to where we wanted to. We’ve both had those moments where we wish we got the workout in, and yeah, there’s shaming in it. There’s this I wish you pushed yourself harder. You got that weight, you should’ve. But how great is it to have that accountability that you know that somebody’s looking out for your best interest, somebody wants to see you be your best self.

Chuck Gaidica:
I’ve got a friend that’s invited me a couple times. I haven’t taken him up on it yet. He’s got another buddy who’s built kind of a small gym in his garage, right? And he said we just go work out in this guy’s garage. And it sounds kind of like a manly thing to do, right? I just haven’t had the moment to get over there. But having a buddy to workout with even if it is a home workout makes perfect sense to me.

Chuck Gaidica:
So that’s really pretty cool. What about setting goals? You’re apparently doing that with your own system but how important is that whether it’s a 30 day goal, six months, whatever it is?

Dan Muncey:
The goals help you work towards something and that’s going to build everything else we’ve talked about, consistency, accountability, scheduling, and so when you’re looking at these at home workouts and goals set yourself up to be successful. It might just be minutes worked out. It might not be how many pushups you did, how fast you did something, how strong you were. It could just simply be like, you know what? I want to exercise twice a week for 30 minutes from home. What a great goal. And guess what? And we talked about it, if you’re doing it for over three weeks you’re going to build a healthy habit and then you can go from there.

Dan Muncey:
Maybe it’s not two days, maybe it’s three days, maybe it’s every day but you started with something, you had a goal, and you knew that it was specific. We talked about smart goals and the great thing about it is you’re going to know what you’re shooting for and you’ll be more likely to achieve it.

Chuck Gaidica:
So let’s talk about this idea of being at home, coming up with a workout, and using stuff that can assist you. You’ve already talked about finding a personal trainer on your phone, right? You can find all kinds of videos. For me, if I were to play the theme from Rocky and just listened I can lift a room, right?

Chuck Gaidica:
I mean, everybody finds their things. Some people like to bring it down. I love to hear Danger Zone, from a movie. It just really psyches me. So depending on what you’re looking for in today’s world you can find it. You can get an app. There’s an app for that or whatever you want to look for, right?

Dan Muncey:
Yeah, I mean, if I put some AC/DC Thunderstruck on I’ll run through a wall, but the great thing is whether it’s an app, we talked about YouTube, I mean, Nike has a great app. Nowadays there’s Beachbody, they have all these at home workouts. A good friend of mine’s a Beachbody coach. There’s an awesome accountability group within that. You have a coach that’s going to check-in with you, see how you’re working out. They have all their videos online. We’ve talked about P90X, all these things, these at home workouts where it’s simplistic, it’s body weight exercises. These insanity workouts. They have things that it’s going to help you be successful.

Dan Muncey:
And then, I talked about the Nike app briefly but that one’s great. What an awesome circuit trainer app. You can literally tell that app what you have. Hey, you know what? I just add my body weight and you can build a workout with it. And I know, like I said, I talked about YouTube, I mean, there’s great peer reviewed sources out there. The ACE, the American Council on Exercise has a great free library online. You can always go onto their website and check out any free exercise if you’re looking for tips, am I doing this exercise the right way?

Dan Muncey:
And you know it’s a peer reviewed source. You’re not just watching something on YouTube and saying was this the best exercise? Did I do it the right way? You’re looking at people that are being held accountable for what they’re teaching.

Chuck Gaidica:
And I now you’re always scanning the countryside for this stuff. If I’m just beginning this, if I really am as of this part of February just catching up to my new year’s resolution, it sounds a little intimidating to think that the first app I’m going to reach for is Beachbody because my body doesn’t look like it belongs on a beach, right? So what would you say would be a good place to start? What kind of app would I look for?

Dan Muncey:
The app that I think everybody should be looking at is their own calendar. That’s an app, you know?

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah.

Dan Muncey:
Put that on your phone, schedule that time in. But as far as like overall what apps I’m seeing out there, there’s this app called Tonal. It’s an all-in-one fitness and virtual trainer app. I mean, obviously I’m not selling them more than anyone else but I think it’s going to set you up for success. We talked about Peloton. My director, she has a Peloton. What an awesome thing that she’s able to get up, tune into a cycling instruction class in the morning. She has that accountability.

Dan Muncey:
She has somebody that’s going to motivate her, play that AC/DC that’s going to get her to run through the wall, and she has that in the comfort of her own home. I think it’s tough for me to talk about apps that I don’t use, but like I said, I know that people are successful with Beachbody. I think the idea is that’s something that you’re thinking long term goals, and understanding that within that program there’s a lot of different options.

Dan Muncey:
You start really small. They have even just like 10 minute trainers. What a great thing. Who doesn’t have 10 minutes to exercise?

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. And the idea that you’re going to use something like that is interesting to me because there is also the low cost plan. If you’ve already got a bike you could even have an old Airdyne in the basement that you didn’t use, or that piece of gear you just got for the holidays that says it’s easy to slide it under your bed and put it away, and you’ve left it there. You can use that stuff and either plug in and listen to music or watch a video yourself. You can create your own Peloton moment if you will, right? You don’t have to spend the money if you don’t want to.

Dan Muncey:
My favorite exercise is get on the … I have an Airdyne bike, it’s in my garage. I plug my TV in the garage and I’ll watch sports, and I’ll casually ride the bike when the sports are on, but when that commercial hits I push it. I ride that bike really hard. And it’s like I’m able to watch the sport game I wanted to watch and I still get a great workout. And again, is it a perfect exercise? No. Could I be doing other things? But I’ve built it into my schedule where I’m going to be successful.

Dan Muncey:
I’m still able to enjoy it and I’m able to build on that. And like you said it’s something that I had just sitting in the garage. I took it from my parents garage. I still have it. What a great thing that I have that but if you don’t have that level of equipment you can do that with pushups, body weight exercises. Maybe when the commercials hit you’re doing jumping Jacks, you’re doing pushups, you’re doing sit ups.

Dan Muncey:
Simple things that you’re just building into your daily routine because I don’t know about you Chuck, I’ve seen probably one too many commercials in my life, and I probably don’t care to see any more than I have.

Chuck Gaidica:
Because you’re on an Airdyne, and let me just say that I am an Airdyne fan. I’ve had two in my lifetime and I have a bike now that’s like it. And I sold it after thousands, literally thousands of miles on the first one, and they’re a little noisy, I get rid of it. We move and I’m missing it. So I went on Craigslist and I found an oldie but goody.

Chuck Gaidica:
It was like 75 bucks. So if you find the thing you like in today’s world you can get it. I mean, you can find it. But admittedly it’s a little noisy. It’s just one of those things when during commercials it’s a perfect idea.

Dan Muncey:
Yes, and again, I don’t mind when that air ramps up and I can barely hear myself think, but I didn’t care to listen to those commercials anyways, so that’s a great point, Chuck.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. So if we’re looking to have equipment that’s available to us, whether you’re going to go the cheapy route and go buy something used, let’s just scan the house for a minute and figure out if we have any equipment that we want to augment body weight exercises, maybe it’s time to take an inventory.

Dan Muncey:
I love the idea of band workouts. You can buy bands very cheap and you can do so many modified exercises whether you’re just doing curls and tricep extensions. You can hold it while you’re doing a squat. You’re doing leg kick backs. You’re doing these things that are so simple, basic exercises, but you’re adding this level of resistance with a band that’s a relatively cheap product.

Dan Muncey:
And especially if you’ve ever gone through any kind of physical activity they’re giving you bands to go through that physical activity because it’s building resistance training. I’ve probably gone through physical therapy one too many times in my life now but the great thing is I have all those bands, I still use them, and I’ve bought more bands because of it.

Chuck Gaidica:
And they travel.

Dan Muncey:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Travel really well.

Chuck Gaidica:
They’re really, really easy to take with you. So we’ve talked about some of the brand names, and not to knock them, or to say anything else because some of these things the cost of doing business, the entry point, is a little higher than what some people can afford. But if that’s your thing, just like accountability can become your thing, maybe you go for it and you find great success.

Dan Muncey:
And like you said Chuck it could be something like looking at Craigslist and finding an old Airdyne bike, treadmill, elliptical. My mom loves to ride her elliptical every morning and she says her prayers. I mean, what an easy thing to build it into her day and be successful.

Chuck Gaidica:
Yeah. So multitasking, watching sports while riding an Airdyne. It’s hard to eat nachos. It’s hard to eat chips and stuff when you’re on your Airdyne.

Dan Muncey:
That’s true.

Chuck Gaidica:
You need to have your hands ready at least for part of it. Hey Dan, it’s good to see you.

Dan Muncey:
Thanks again, Chuck, and you know I think the best thing that we can take away from today is that it doesn’t matter what you do just do something and find time for it while you’re at home.

Chuck Gaidica:
You can’t start if you don’t begin, right?

Dan Muncey:
Absolutely.

Chuck Gaidica:
So let’s start something. Take the opportunity to plan a workout regiment, do it today in your home. I’m encouraged. I’m not quite sure I’ll get to the beach body by the beginning of spring but I’ll work at it. Find yourself some kind of home workout, is the point of this entire podcast, that you think you could enjoy, and then ease into it. Just experiment, and don’t be afraid to fail. That’s one of the great encouragements I’m getting from Dan in this podcast today.

Chuck Gaidica:
We really thank you for being with us and listening to A Healthier Michigan Podcast. It’s brought to you by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. If you like the show, you want to learn more, we’ve got great episodes for you about everything. It runs the gamut, really. It could be about mental health and mindfulness. It can be about fitness, nutrition. Check us out online at ahealthiermichigan.org/podcast. You can leave reviews or ratings on Apple Podcast or Stitcher, and you can always get new episodes on your smart phone or tablet.

Chuck Gaidica:
And be sure to subscribe to us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. With Dan Muncey I’m Chuck Gaidica, have a great day. Be encouraged. You can do something at home and start today.