Patient Safety Program Pioneered in Michigan Hospitals Embraced Nationwide

This guest post is by Sam R. Watson, senior vice president, Patient Safety and Quality at the Michigan Health & Hospital Association and executive director of the MHA Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently released an interim report showing a 35 percent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) among adult intensive care units (ICUs) from more than 350 participating hospitals. The On the CUSP: Stop Bloodstream Infections (BSI) project [PDF] is designed to reduce the average rate of CLABSIs in hospitals by 80 percent.

“A lifesaving hospital intervention, voluntarily undertaken by roughly 70 Michigan hospitals in 2003, has grown to a national endeavor that now includes 1,100 hospitals from 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The pioneering patient safety work of Michigan’s dedicated community hospitals’ clinicians and administrators has not only saved the lives of patients here, but is now helping do so in hospitals throughout the country,” said MHA President Spencer Johnson. “Our partnership with the Health Research & Educational Trust and the Johns Hopkins University Quality Safety and Research Group has raised expectations of quality and improved the culture of safety in hospitals. Michigan’s expert hospital clinicians remain committed to creating and refining patient safety programs. It can now be said that one of Michigan’s greatest exports is ‘quality.’”

Hospitals across the nation and around the globe continue to look to Michigan as a model for reducing patient harm and providing high-quality care.

On the CUSP: Stop BSI

In February 2009, with support from the AHRQ, On the CUSP: BSI launched in 10 states using the MHA Keystone: ICU model developed by the MHA Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality. That fall, invitations to participate were extended to hospitals from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Currently, 1,100 hospitals from 45 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have enrolled in the national effort.

On the CUSP: Stop BSI is scheduled to continue through 2012 and is showing measurable success nationwide. The American Hospital Association, the MHA and many other state hospital associations are actively promoting the project. The MHA Keystone Center, the Johns Hopkins University Quality and Safety Research Group and the Health Research & Educational Trust work together to provide participating hospitals with the necessary tools and training to reduce these infections in hospital ICUs. Participating hospitals, in an effort to improve the patient safety culture, are implementing a checklist to ensure compliance with safety practices and integrate enhanced communication, teamwork and leadership.

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